emilioet

Ott 10

therealbsmile:

1924 World Series Panoramic With President Coolidge Griffith Stadium, Washington D.C. - October 1924Washington Senators vs. New York Giants
~ On this day 90 years ago, October 10, 1924, Walter Johnson and the Washington Senators dramatically won their first and only World Championship in the 12th inning of the seventh and final game.

therealbsmile:

1924 World Series Panoramic With President Coolidge
Griffith Stadium, Washington D.C. - October 1924
Washington Senators vs. New York Giants

~ On this day 90 years ago, October 10, 1924, Walter Johnson and the Washington Senators dramatically won their first and only World Championship in the 12th inning of the seventh and final game.

(Fonte: baseballbybsmile)

Set 08

therealbsmile:

Baseball’s Best Old Timers Gather In Beantown 84 Yrs Ago Today - Braves Field, Boston - September 8, 1930
~ Here’s an amazing image from one of the earliest Old Timers Day events on record. The assemblage of late-19th/early-20th century baseball greats is astounding, including Billy Hamilton, Cy Young, Ty Cobb, Ed Walsh, Eddie Collins, Tris Speaker, Chief Bender, Harry Hooper & Home Run Baker.

therealbsmile:

Baseball’s Best Old Timers Gather In Beantown
84 Yrs Ago Today - Braves Field, Boston - September 8, 1930

~ Here’s an amazing image from one of the earliest Old Timers Day events on record. The assemblage of late-19th/early-20th century baseball greats is astounding, including Billy Hamilton, Cy Young, Ty Cobb, Ed Walsh, Eddie Collins, Tris Speaker, Chief Bender, Harry Hooper & Home Run Baker.

(Fonte: facebook.com, via baseballbybsmile)

Set 05

so I like the fact that the Western languages allow me to say things that I otherwise can’t.
mightyflynn:

Veteran first baseman Carlos Pena remembered one of his frequent encounters with Ichiro. He was defending first for the Tampa Bay Rays, and Ichiro had just arrived on one of his patented infield hits. Ichiro peered over at Pena and asked, “Que coño tu mira?,” or, “What the hell are you looking at?” Pena clamped his lips together to prevent the laughter from bursting through.
Ichiro says he cannot carry a conversation in Spanish, which he has gradually picked up during his years in baseball. But, contrary to his stoic image, he feels compelled to engage Latin players.
"I feel a bond with them," he said. "We’re all foreigners in a strange land. We’ve come over here and had to cope with some of the same trials and tribulations. When I throw a little Spanish out at them, they really seem to appreciate it and it seems to strengthen that bond. And besides, we don’t really have curse words in Japanese, so I like the fact that the Western languages allow me to say things that I otherwise can’t."
- Brad Lefton (Wall Street Journal)
Read the rest: "Ichiro Suzuki Uncensored, en Español"
Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images North America
h/t @daigofuji

so I like the fact that the Western languages allow me to say things that I otherwise can’t.

mightyflynn:

Veteran first baseman Carlos Pena remembered one of his frequent encounters with Ichiro. He was defending first for the Tampa Bay Rays, and Ichiro had just arrived on one of his patented infield hits. Ichiro peered over at Pena and asked, “Que coño tu mira?,” or, “What the hell are you looking at?” Pena clamped his lips together to prevent the laughter from bursting through.

Ichiro says he cannot carry a conversation in Spanish, which he has gradually picked up during his years in baseball. But, contrary to his stoic image, he feels compelled to engage Latin players.

"I feel a bond with them," he said. "We’re all foreigners in a strange land. We’ve come over here and had to cope with some of the same trials and tribulations. When I throw a little Spanish out at them, they really seem to appreciate it and it seems to strengthen that bond. And besides, we don’t really have curse words in Japanese, so I like the fact that the Western languages allow me to say things that I otherwise can’t."

- Brad Lefton (Wall Street Journal)

Read the rest: "Ichiro Suzuki Uncensored, en Español"

Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images North America

h/t @daigofuji

(via this-day-in-baseball)

Set 03

13 Popular Science Books Everyone Should Read -

dailyzenlist:

1. A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking — A book in which Hawking attempts to explain a range of subjects in cosmology to the non-specialist reader.

2. A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson — The history of science through the stories of the people who made the…

Giu 25

[video]

Giu 12

mlb:

We enhanced the footage of Yo’s throw, and … yes, that’s a rocket.

mlb:

We enhanced the footage of Yo’s throw, and … yes, that’s a rocket.

Giu 05

“Sabermetrics is NOT about who is better than who or where players should be rated; not at all. It is about Why Teams Win, and How the Game Changes, and Why the Game Changes, and Why the Game Works.” —

Bill James, from “Hey Bill” Q and A (March 15, 2014) 

via @sabermetrics101

(via mightyflynn)

[video]

“My idea is that I’m sitting next to the listener in the ballpark, and we’re just watching the game. Sometimes, our conversation leaves the game. It might be a little bit about the weather we’re enduring or enjoying. It might be personal relationships, which would involve a player. The game is just one long conversation and I’m anticipating that, and I will say things like ‘Did you know that?’ or ‘You’re probably wondering why.’ I’m really just conversing rather than just doing play-by-play. I never thought of myself as having a style. I don’t use key words. And the best thing I do? I shut up.” —

Vin Scully

Read the rest: “‘We’ve Been Friends Long Enough You’ll Understand’: Vin Scully, Baseball’s Longest-Tenured and Most Eloquent Broadcaster, is Still Looking to Make a Connection” by Cee Angi (SB Nation)

(Fonte: mightyflynn, via this-day-in-baseball)

this-day-in-baseball:

riddlemethisbatman:

this-day-in-baseball:

sportspage:

A Major League Pitcher’s Guide To Baseball’s Bullshit Unwritten Rules - Deadspin

This is well worth every minute you will spend reading it. Baseball “purists” can say whatever they want to rationalize the sport’s unwritten rules, but this calls those rules out for exactly what they are.

This repulses me, the only reason This Day in Baseball has ANY followers is because Baseball is built on tradition and a rich history. Endorsing this article makes your page hypocritical.

This repulses you? This? Seriously? Wow, I usually only have that effect on people who know me personally.
The only reason I have any followers is because there are people who share my love of baseball. A lot of people, actually. But does that mean we have to like everything that goes on in it? Of course not, that’s ridiculous. See, we understand that not only is it possible to love baseball without liking everything about it, it’s an essential part of being human, and it’s absolutely necessary to being a better fan.
Loving baseball doesn’t mean turning a blind eye to attitudes and behaviors that are just plain wrong just because they’re “tradition” or part of a “rich history”. Are you comfortable with all of baseball’s traditions and rich history? Are you really?
Are you alright with baseball’s history of cheating? You ok with a player breaking whatever rules he has to to artificially inflate his stats? You ok with a juicer going into the record books appearing to generations of fans yet to be born to be one of the greatest players of all time?
How about baseball’s rich history of racism? You cool with that too? Would you be ok with it if the game was still segregated? I mean, if it was good enough for the first 70 or so years of professional baseball, it should still be good enough for us today, right?
How about the tradition and rich history of farm clubs paying players what, in some cases, amounts to less than minimum wage? I mean, c’mon, those guys get to go out and play baseball everyday. They should be grateful that they get to play. What difference does it make if they have to share a two-bedroom apartment with seven other guys? Who cares if they can’t afford to support their families. At least they get to play baseball, right?
As someone who made it far enough in this game to experience some of the “tradition” and “rich history” you’re so fond of, I can honestly say if you answered yes to any of those questions, you sure aren’t the kind of person I would ever want to know, and you sure don’t love baseball. Attitudes like yours are shameful. They’re willfully ignorant. They’re juvenile. They’re bullshit.
Baseball is the best sport there is, ever was or ever will be, and those of us who love baseball bask in its awesomeness. We’re proud of it for how far it’s come, even if some individuals had to be dragged kicking and screaming or just got left behind on the wrong side of history. We also work to make it better. I am one of this game’s most hardcore evangelists because I love it more than everything except my kids, and there are even some days I wonder about them. But my love isn’t blind. Real love never is. See, blind love ain’t love, it’s just blind.
Call me a hypocrite? Want to unfollow me? Hey, that’s cool, man. That’s one of the great things about this life: we’ve all got our opinions, and we’re all welcome to keep them. I hope for your sake and for the sake of the game that you really examine your opinions from time to time just to see what they’re really all about. But, look inward or don’t, really makes no difference to me. I’ll wish you a peaceful journey on down the road regardless.

this-day-in-baseball:

riddlemethisbatman:

this-day-in-baseball:

sportspage:

A Major League Pitcher’s Guide To Baseball’s Bullshit Unwritten Rules - Deadspin

This is well worth every minute you will spend reading it. Baseball “purists” can say whatever they want to rationalize the sport’s unwritten rules, but this calls those rules out for exactly what they are.

This repulses me, the only reason This Day in Baseball has ANY followers is because Baseball is built on tradition and a rich history. Endorsing this article makes your page hypocritical.

This repulses you? This? Seriously? Wow, I usually only have that effect on people who know me personally.

The only reason I have any followers is because there are people who share my love of baseball. A lot of people, actually. But does that mean we have to like everything that goes on in it? Of course not, that’s ridiculous. See, we understand that not only is it possible to love baseball without liking everything about it, it’s an essential part of being human, and it’s absolutely necessary to being a better fan.

Loving baseball doesn’t mean turning a blind eye to attitudes and behaviors that are just plain wrong just because they’re “tradition” or part of a “rich history”. Are you comfortable with all of baseball’s traditions and rich history? Are you really?

Are you alright with baseball’s history of cheating? You ok with a player breaking whatever rules he has to to artificially inflate his stats? You ok with a juicer going into the record books appearing to generations of fans yet to be born to be one of the greatest players of all time?

How about baseball’s rich history of racism? You cool with that too? Would you be ok with it if the game was still segregated? I mean, if it was good enough for the first 70 or so years of professional baseball, it should still be good enough for us today, right?

How about the tradition and rich history of farm clubs paying players what, in some cases, amounts to less than minimum wage? I mean, c’mon, those guys get to go out and play baseball everyday. They should be grateful that they get to play. What difference does it make if they have to share a two-bedroom apartment with seven other guys? Who cares if they can’t afford to support their families. At least they get to play baseball, right?

As someone who made it far enough in this game to experience some of the “tradition” and “rich history” you’re so fond of, I can honestly say if you answered yes to any of those questions, you sure aren’t the kind of person I would ever want to know, and you sure don’t love baseball. Attitudes like yours are shameful. They’re willfully ignorant. They’re juvenile. They’re bullshit.

Baseball is the best sport there is, ever was or ever will be, and those of us who love baseball bask in its awesomeness. We’re proud of it for how far it’s come, even if some individuals had to be dragged kicking and screaming or just got left behind on the wrong side of history. We also work to make it better. I am one of this game’s most hardcore evangelists because I love it more than everything except my kids, and there are even some days I wonder about them. But my love isn’t blind. Real love never is. See, blind love ain’t love, it’s just blind.

Call me a hypocrite? Want to unfollow me? Hey, that’s cool, man. That’s one of the great things about this life: we’ve all got our opinions, and we’re all welcome to keep them. I hope for your sake and for the sake of the game that you really examine your opinions from time to time just to see what they’re really all about. But, look inward or don’t, really makes no difference to me. I’ll wish you a peaceful journey on down the road regardless.