emilioet

Giu 25

[video]

Giu 12

mlb:

We enhanced the footage of Yo’s throw, and … yes, that’s a rocket.

mlb:

We enhanced the footage of Yo’s throw, and … yes, that’s a rocket.

Giu 05

“Sabermetrics is NOT about who is better than who or where players should be rated; not at all. It is about Why Teams Win, and How the Game Changes, and Why the Game Changes, and Why the Game Works.” —

Bill James, from “Hey Bill” Q and A (March 15, 2014) 

via @sabermetrics101

(via mightyflynn)

[video]

“My idea is that I’m sitting next to the listener in the ballpark, and we’re just watching the game. Sometimes, our conversation leaves the game. It might be a little bit about the weather we’re enduring or enjoying. It might be personal relationships, which would involve a player. The game is just one long conversation and I’m anticipating that, and I will say things like ‘Did you know that?’ or ‘You’re probably wondering why.’ I’m really just conversing rather than just doing play-by-play. I never thought of myself as having a style. I don’t use key words. And the best thing I do? I shut up.” —

Vin Scully

Read the rest: “‘We’ve Been Friends Long Enough You’ll Understand’: Vin Scully, Baseball’s Longest-Tenured and Most Eloquent Broadcaster, is Still Looking to Make a Connection” by Cee Angi (SB Nation)

(Fonte: mightyflynn, via this-day-in-baseball)

this-day-in-baseball:

riddlemethisbatman:

this-day-in-baseball:

sportspage:

A Major League Pitcher’s Guide To Baseball’s Bullshit Unwritten Rules - Deadspin

This is well worth every minute you will spend reading it. Baseball “purists” can say whatever they want to rationalize the sport’s unwritten rules, but this calls those rules out for exactly what they are.

This repulses me, the only reason This Day in Baseball has ANY followers is because Baseball is built on tradition and a rich history. Endorsing this article makes your page hypocritical.

This repulses you? This? Seriously? Wow, I usually only have that effect on people who know me personally.
The only reason I have any followers is because there are people who share my love of baseball. A lot of people, actually. But does that mean we have to like everything that goes on in it? Of course not, that’s ridiculous. See, we understand that not only is it possible to love baseball without liking everything about it, it’s an essential part of being human, and it’s absolutely necessary to being a better fan.
Loving baseball doesn’t mean turning a blind eye to attitudes and behaviors that are just plain wrong just because they’re “tradition” or part of a “rich history”. Are you comfortable with all of baseball’s traditions and rich history? Are you really?
Are you alright with baseball’s history of cheating? You ok with a player breaking whatever rules he has to to artificially inflate his stats? You ok with a juicer going into the record books appearing to generations of fans yet to be born to be one of the greatest players of all time?
How about baseball’s rich history of racism? You cool with that too? Would you be ok with it if the game was still segregated? I mean, if it was good enough for the first 70 or so years of professional baseball, it should still be good enough for us today, right?
How about the tradition and rich history of farm clubs paying players what, in some cases, amounts to less than minimum wage? I mean, c’mon, those guys get to go out and play baseball everyday. They should be grateful that they get to play. What difference does it make if they have to share a two-bedroom apartment with seven other guys? Who cares if they can’t afford to support their families. At least they get to play baseball, right?
As someone who made it far enough in this game to experience some of the “tradition” and “rich history” you’re so fond of, I can honestly say if you answered yes to any of those questions, you sure aren’t the kind of person I would ever want to know, and you sure don’t love baseball. Attitudes like yours are shameful. They’re willfully ignorant. They’re juvenile. They’re bullshit.
Baseball is the best sport there is, ever was or ever will be, and those of us who love baseball bask in its awesomeness. We’re proud of it for how far it’s come, even if some individuals had to be dragged kicking and screaming or just got left behind on the wrong side of history. We also work to make it better. I am one of this game’s most hardcore evangelists because I love it more than everything except my kids, and there are even some days I wonder about them. But my love isn’t blind. Real love never is. See, blind love ain’t love, it’s just blind.
Call me a hypocrite? Want to unfollow me? Hey, that’s cool, man. That’s one of the great things about this life: we’ve all got our opinions, and we’re all welcome to keep them. I hope for your sake and for the sake of the game that you really examine your opinions from time to time just to see what they’re really all about. But, look inward or don’t, really makes no difference to me. I’ll wish you a peaceful journey on down the road regardless.

this-day-in-baseball:

riddlemethisbatman:

this-day-in-baseball:

sportspage:

A Major League Pitcher’s Guide To Baseball’s Bullshit Unwritten Rules - Deadspin

This is well worth every minute you will spend reading it. Baseball “purists” can say whatever they want to rationalize the sport’s unwritten rules, but this calls those rules out for exactly what they are.

This repulses me, the only reason This Day in Baseball has ANY followers is because Baseball is built on tradition and a rich history. Endorsing this article makes your page hypocritical.

This repulses you? This? Seriously? Wow, I usually only have that effect on people who know me personally.

The only reason I have any followers is because there are people who share my love of baseball. A lot of people, actually. But does that mean we have to like everything that goes on in it? Of course not, that’s ridiculous. See, we understand that not only is it possible to love baseball without liking everything about it, it’s an essential part of being human, and it’s absolutely necessary to being a better fan.

Loving baseball doesn’t mean turning a blind eye to attitudes and behaviors that are just plain wrong just because they’re “tradition” or part of a “rich history”. Are you comfortable with all of baseball’s traditions and rich history? Are you really?

Are you alright with baseball’s history of cheating? You ok with a player breaking whatever rules he has to to artificially inflate his stats? You ok with a juicer going into the record books appearing to generations of fans yet to be born to be one of the greatest players of all time?

How about baseball’s rich history of racism? You cool with that too? Would you be ok with it if the game was still segregated? I mean, if it was good enough for the first 70 or so years of professional baseball, it should still be good enough for us today, right?

How about the tradition and rich history of farm clubs paying players what, in some cases, amounts to less than minimum wage? I mean, c’mon, those guys get to go out and play baseball everyday. They should be grateful that they get to play. What difference does it make if they have to share a two-bedroom apartment with seven other guys? Who cares if they can’t afford to support their families. At least they get to play baseball, right?

As someone who made it far enough in this game to experience some of the “tradition” and “rich history” you’re so fond of, I can honestly say if you answered yes to any of those questions, you sure aren’t the kind of person I would ever want to know, and you sure don’t love baseball. Attitudes like yours are shameful. They’re willfully ignorant. They’re juvenile. They’re bullshit.

Baseball is the best sport there is, ever was or ever will be, and those of us who love baseball bask in its awesomeness. We’re proud of it for how far it’s come, even if some individuals had to be dragged kicking and screaming or just got left behind on the wrong side of history. We also work to make it better. I am one of this game’s most hardcore evangelists because I love it more than everything except my kids, and there are even some days I wonder about them. But my love isn’t blind. Real love never is. See, blind love ain’t love, it’s just blind.

Call me a hypocrite? Want to unfollow me? Hey, that’s cool, man. That’s one of the great things about this life: we’ve all got our opinions, and we’re all welcome to keep them. I hope for your sake and for the sake of the game that you really examine your opinions from time to time just to see what they’re really all about. But, look inward or don’t, really makes no difference to me. I’ll wish you a peaceful journey on down the road regardless.

Apr 19

youk in japan

youk in japan

(Fonte: hamutime)

Apr 15

mightyflynn:

“I don’t pretend to be any expert on communism or any other kind of a political ‘ism. But you can put me down as an expert at being a colored American, with thirty years of experience at it. And just like any other colored person with sense enough to look around him and understand what he sees, I know that life in these United States can be mighty tough for people who are a little different from the majority—in their skin color, or the way they worship God, or the way they spell their names.”
- Jackie Robinson, from his statement to the House Un-American Activities Committee (July 18, 1949)
AP Photo/William J. Smith

mightyflynn:

“I don’t pretend to be any expert on communism or any other kind of a political ‘ism. But you can put me down as an expert at being a colored American, with thirty years of experience at it. And just like any other colored person with sense enough to look around him and understand what he sees, I know that life in these United States can be mighty tough for people who are a little different from the majority—in their skin color, or the way they worship God, or the way they spell their names.”

- Jackie Robinson, from his statement to the House Un-American Activities Committee (July 18, 1949)

AP Photo/William J. Smith

Apr 04

“There’s still very large market inefficiencies that can be exploited by a team. There are some areas where I can’t go into it, because I work for one team and I owe them my best insight. And there are some areas where someone could gain a big advantage, but I’m not going to tell you what they are—I don’t want to see baseball go in that direction. All innovation changes the game, but not all innovation changes the game for the better. To give an example from the past: In the 1970s, hitters began to realize that there was nothing to stop them from stepping out of the box between pitches to gather their thoughts and resettle and take a second to think through the pitching plans. They changed the game a lot, but not for the better. And each player was doing what was in their best interests. It helped them, it didn’t help the game. I think there are things like that, that are in the selfish interests of players or teams, but that I wouldn’t really talk about.” —

Bill James

Read the rest: "The Original Nate Silver Also Thinks Pundits Are ‘Stupid’: Bill James on "moneyball" in 2014 and backward political thinking" (New Republic)

h/t @kballhistory

(via mightyflynn)

therealbsmile:

1947 Chesterfield Cigarettes AdFeaturing Ted Williams & Stan Musial

therealbsmile:

1947 Chesterfield Cigarettes Ad
Featuring Ted Williams & Stan Musial

(Fonte: baseball-fever.com)